“Queer Straight Photographs”
2016-2018

“What does transparency keep obscure?”
-Judith Butler, in the 1999 preface to “Gender Trouble” (1990)

“Queer Straight Photographs” interrogates straight photography’s privileged position as a presumably normative, ubiquitous, and transparent medium, especially when it attempts to represent subjects that attempt to evade normalization: that is, subjects that are queer.

My studio practice explores how the cultural categories of “identity” and “body” are represented in photography. My work simultaneously considers the possibilities and the limitations of how a person’s body can be interpreted when transformed into a photograph.

The process of making images of people and their bodies can produce a rare opportunity to destabilize cultural assumptions made about both identity and body, and the seemingly intrinsic and natural links between the two.

This is particularly true in the flexible, slippery, yet-to-be-determined disciplinary area of photography. Like bodies and identities, photography as a discipline has yet to solidify, less than two-hundred years after its invention, and remains viscous, radical, and constantly in flux.

Hand, 2016, Inkjet Print, 40 x 30 in.

Thighs, 2016, Inkjet Print, 40 x 30 in.

Jockstrap, 2016, Inkjet Print, 40 x 30 in.

Leaf, 2016, Inkjet Print, 40 x 30 in.

Moon, 2016, Inkjet Print, 20 x 16 in.

Globe, 2016, Inkjet Print, 34 x 24 in.

Window, 2016, Inkjet Print, 20 x 16 in.

Wall, 2016, Inkjet Print, 20 x 16 in.

Reflection, 2018, Inkjet Print, 36 x 24 in.

Shed Light, 2018, Inkjet Print, 19 x 16 in.